Seamless Episode 9: Nearly New

We sat down for a chat with Jacqueline Courtney, founder and CEO of Nearly Newlywed, an online marketplace for sample and resale luxury bridal wear.

We sat down for a chat with Jacqueline Courtney, founder and CEO of Nearly Newlywed, an online marketplace for sample and resale luxury bridal wear.

Courtney previously represented high fashion brands as a publicist and talks about how that experience combined with her own nuptials, fueled her desire to bring accessible luxury fashion to brides all over the United States.

Hear how Courtney’s ‘just do it’ approach took her from launching Nearly Newlywed in a New York City apartment to NBC’s Shark Tank to growing a dedicated team that supports thousands of happy brides.

Seamless Episode 8: Period Talk

When you buy tampons, are you making a conscious choice? Do you opt for the same pink-labeled box your mother handed you in seventh grade without second thought, eager to get home before it’s too late to consider ordering take-out for dinner.

Molly Hayward is redefining the way women are learning about menstruation, purchasing products and giving back. She’s the co-founder of Cora, a modern feminine product brand that delivers tailored tampon orders to subscribers.

Hayward is at the helm of a global movement to change the language around periods. For every Cora subscription, a month’s supply of pads and education is given to girls in India and Kenya.

In this episode, BF intern Nicole Fallert spoke with Hayward about social entrepreneurship, the power of partnerships and accessibility.

Follow Molly Hayward on Instagram @mollyrosehayward and Nicole @nflrt6789. Got comments and suggestions for Seamless? Email partnerships@burgundyfox.com.

Seamless Episode 6: Her Way

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OUAI wave spray provides a natural and “undone” texture to your hair.

O-U-A-I, but it’s pronounced “way.”

This is the name of the once of the fastest-growing online haircare companies, and they’re changing the roots of hair treatment.

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In this episode of “Seamless,” Burgundy Fox intern Nicole Fallert spoke with Brittney Barrett, Director of Digital at Ouai. She spoke about building a brand, content strategy and creative teamwork.

Follow Brittney on Instagram @microsoftpaint and Nicole @nflrt6789. Got questions or comments about Seamless? Contact partnerships@burgundyfox.com.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Seamless Episode 7: Lady On A Mission

Laura Nestler knows a thing or two about achieving a work/life balance, and it’s because she’s blended the two together. Seamlessly.

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Prior to her current position as Director of Community at Duolingo, Nestler worked with both Yelp and HoneyBook, connecting costumers around the globe with these companies’ products. She designed the infrastructure that allowed Yelp to jump off internationally so that you can search for that perfect day spa while abroad with your in-laws.

Nestler is also responsible for assisting with HoneyBook’s partnership with The Rising Tide Society, which connects creative entrepreneurs internationally with the resources they need to build their businesses.

In this episode, BF intern Nicole Fallert speaks with Nestler about leadership, the power of language and always asking yourself one question: “Why?”

You can follow Laura on Instagram @lauranestler and Nicole @nflrt6789. Got questions or comments about Seamless? Email partnerships@burgundyfox.com.

Seamless Episode 5: She’s Rising

Have you ever been doing what you love, but felt lonely while doing it? Natalie Franke was a successful wedding photographer after college, but she lacked the resources and support necessary to build her brand. Creative entrepreneurship felt isolating for her, so Natalie decided to close the gap between her passion and community.

She started the Rising Tide Society in 2015 and the organization now hosts chapters internationally to foster support for creatives. Rising Tide Society is also a part of HoneyBook, which offers management software for creative businesses. Natalie serves as the head of community for HoneyBook, and regularly posts video blogs and some very motivational Instagram stories. The University of Pennsylvania graduate is now an educator, writer and community builder.

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Listen here as Natalie speaks with Burgundy Fox intern Nicole Fallert about neuroscience, social media advertising and what she wants to be when she grows up.

Follow Natalie on social media @nataliefranke or catch up with Nicole @nflrt6789. Got questions or comments about Seamless? Email partnerships@burgundyfox.com.

 

 

 

 

Seamless Episode 4: Tune In For Love

Rachel Silver has discovered something addictive. And it’s gluten-free, good for the heart and you can stream it from your kitchen while cook. Who knew such a thing existed?

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Silver is the founder of Love Stories TV, a media platform which aggregates professional wedding videos. Anyone can submit a video, and it’ll be accepted on the site. The most popular videos are shared on Love Stories’ social media, where strangers at very cool weddings regularly takeover the story.

The product is addictive wedding videos that don’t turn someone’s special day into a commodity. It’s about connection, inspiration and inclusivity. BF intern Nicole Fallert spoke with Silver about starting the platform, user engagement and of course, true love.

Follow Rachel on social media @racheljosilver or catch up with Nicole @nflrt6789. Got questions or comments about Seamless? Email partnerships@burgundyfox.com.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Seamless Episode 3: Believe In The Hustle with Dannie Fountain

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Speaking of side hustles…Dannie is also a Burgundy Fox model!

Seamless take three explores the social media strategy and career risks with Dannie Fountain, a self-defined “marketing expert, business strategist, author, educator, digital nomad and whip-smart whiskey drinker.”

In this episode, Burgundy Fox intern Nicole Fallert speaks with Dannie about how she turned a side hustle into a full-time job and still finds time for wanderlust.

Transcript

Hey! It’s Nicole and welcome back to Seamless.

In this episode, we’re talking hustle. That’s the word Dannie Fountain uses to describe her work as a marketing strategist, writer and teacher. She’s traveled the world, worked in the corporate sector and now she’s an entrepreneur helping other business owners build their brand, seamlessly.

Here’s my conversation with Dannie.

Transcript:

Nicole Fallert: Can you just tell me what you do?

Dannie Fountain: I am a marketing strategist, author and educator. I work with corporate clients and small businesses to get their house in order and come up with a marketing plan that’s going to really move the needle for them

NF: Can you tell me what you mean by strategy? On your website and your content, I feel like the word strategy is used a lot. That can really run the gamut, so what does strategy meant to you?

DF: Strategy is thinking about a direction that you want to go in. It can be a micro-direction like launching something or macro-direction like pivoting your entire business and essentially coming up with the entire game plan that you’re going to need to work through to get there.

If it’s something micro, you may think what needs to happen so people know about the launch so that it goes well. If it a macro change, you’re thinking through everything that needs to happen so the pivot is successful, be that raising awareness or making sure the brand voice from the old branding to the new brand carries over so the whole transition is seamless. It’s really more than just posting on social media.

NF: I like that you used the word seamless! I want to ask you how you get that transition to be well-layered when working with a business you may not be familiar with or content you’ve never approached. How do you jump in cold turkey and know what’s wrong or what needs to change

DF: The first step of any project I always do is an audit. The client goes through a document and lets me know what they think their business is doing in terms of marketing, PR and social media and the message their business is sending. I’m able to go through and check the reality against what they think and identify the gaps.

NF: Do people have conceptions of their successes and failures are when they self-evaluate?

DF: Folks undervalue themselves! They don’t see that a part of their business is really powerful and people are resonating with it or they think that a piece that’s actually performing well is a waste of time.

NF: What kind of businesses and organizations do you like to work with?

DF: The most fun that I have is in projects where a business is trying to turn an industry on its head. They’re in an industry where the conversation, the way the industry sells and the products have been the same for a really long time and they’re looking to challenge the pre-defined norms through messaging.

NF: How does your background and personal life inform your professional life?

DF: It’s seamless hand in hand. For better or for worse. there isn’t really a separation. I’m a big traveler and I think my wanderlust and desire to find the hidden treasures helps when performing audits and finding ideas that are fresh and new. It’s about the diamonds in the rough in the business world.

In my corporate time, I worked for Whirlpool company, which was a103-year- company old trying to innovate the market while competing solely on price. Flipping that industry so that price wasn’t even a question was a huge learning lesson and there were a lot of takeaways for me.

NF: Leaving that corporate structure and going into your own business was a risk. Was there a point when you said, “I’m doing the right thing.”  

DF: My skip from corporate to full-time entrepreneur was an accident. I had been side hustling all along and then in 2016, I got laid off twice in three months. For me, it was a case of, “If the corporate world doesn’t trust me, why don’t I try trusting myself?”
NF: What did it feel like to trust yourself?
DF: I went from having a steady corporate income and a reliable side hustle income to just my side hustle income overnight. It was believing in the the hustle before I believed in myself.

I had to find value in the hustle so I could find value in making the leap.
NF: Okay, so what does “side hustle” mean?

Google defines hustle as busy movement and activity. But what does the word mean in the context of business?

I’ve heard the term “hustle” or “side hustle” more often than not lately,  and this may be due to the fact that 44 million American adults have a source of income other than their day job, according to a July 2017 report by Bankrate.

This fact stems from the idea that extra cash means paying off student loans and capital investment for your future. With one quarter of millennials with side hustles making $500 dollars a month, according to Bankrate, why not take on another job?

There’s evening side hustle nation.com, an online source dedicated to the creation of your side hustle. It’s a complete guide to creating a part-time business that’s passion-driven and most importantly, paid.

Now I’m thinking about my own side-hustle possibilities. I have always been good at posting that perfect Instagram…Now, back to Dannie

NF: One thing I’ve noticed on your website is that you’re a really good writer. You have a very strong voice, and I want to know how writing has informed your work. Do you find your voice is changing as you’ve developed your business?

DF: In the beginning, I wrote very safely. I educated, but I educated in a way that would not turn anyone off. The longer I’ve been here, the more willing I am to infuse my personality in my writing, which is interesting. The more I’ve infused my personality in my writing, the better it’s gotten. I was almost doing myself a disservice in the beginning. I would say that trusting my voice has helped my business, and the reason I decided to rebrand from an agency name to my name.

NF: What’s your advice for someone who is considering skipping out of a corporate job structure but doesn’t feel ready to take that leap?

DF: There is no one-way to go from the corporate world an entrepreneur.

It’s one-third guts, one-third planning and having a process and one-third trusting yourself.

The gut piece being, “Do I know I can actually sit down and get work done, because if I need the pressure of something else in my life to perform, don’t do it.”

The planning piece is, “Do I know where I want my risk to go long-term?” If you don’t have an answer,stay in your corporate job.

The third piece, that’s the hardest, but that’s the piece that connects it all

NF: What’s something that you’re most proud of?

DF: Being willing to be myself in business. To dance the line between corporate and entrepreneur, while owning the fact I side hustled for so long and being an entrepreneur was never really the goal. It used to be something I did to travel.

NF: One thing I’ve noticed a lot is even just my behaviors in my purchasing and my absorbtion of social media are reflected in the advertisements I see on my laptop screen.  I’d like to know your perspective on social media advertising.

DF: I was having a conversation about this recently. Take an influencer for example. People are not upset if they partner with a brand. They get upset when this influencer don’t disclose that it was a partnership. I think we’ll see a movement towards honest advertising. We’re going to see brands that can be unafraid to share the painful parts. These will be the brands that do really well.

NF: Let’s say I’m your average Instagram user with a pretty good presence. What would be your advice if that user wanted to build his or her brand and collaborate with actual products?

DF: Be consistent. As you build what you’re working on, you want to be an evangelist. Be the person known for one thing. Even though I’m an entrepreneur, an author…I this, I that, when you ask someone on Instagram what they know me, for it’s my whiskey. I’m always talking about whiskey.

That is the way to build engagement. People come back to see what I’ve tried recently, or if i found something new that I liked. That’s how you build consistent recurring engagement. Virality is good, that’s what gives you hundreds of followers, but it’s not sustainable. It’s not what gives you recurring following.

Got comments or suggestions for our new podcast?  Email partnerships@burgundyfox.com.